ANZAC Day

ANZAC Day

Lest we forget.

The significance of the poppy for ANZAC Day.

The bright red Flanders Poppy has become a symbol of remembrance and hope, with millions of people around the world, donning the flower during occasions such as ANZAC Day and Remembrance Day.

This ANZAC Day, while reflecting on the sacrifice many brave men and women made so that we could live in a free country, we wanted to look back at the history of this beautiful flower and how it came to represent a symbol of hope.

During the First World War (1914–1918), the countryside of Western Europe was subjected to continuous blasting and bombing. As a result, the land became broken and barren, a reflection of the sadness at the events which took place in the fields. Despite the devastating torture the land was subjected to, one day, something miraculous happened. The artillery shells and shrapnel which had disturbed the earth, exposed the seeds of the Flanders poppy to the sunlight, allowing them to flourish in the trenches and craters of the embattled grounds. The beauty of these poppies, growing through such devastation, inspired Canadian doctor John McCrae to pen his now famous poem ‘In Flanders Fields’ in 1915. From that day, the Flanders Poppies became a symbol of hope and remembrance around the world. For many, not only do the bright red colour of the petals represent a solum reminder of the blood of the fallen, but these resilient flowers it also serves as a reminder of how we do have the power to triumph over adversity.

You can show your support for those currently serving in our Armed Forces, veterans, and their families and dependants, by making a donation to the ANZAC Appeal here (https://anzacappeal.com.au/).

Lest we forget.

Photo by beasty . on Unsplash


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